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 Contributions

The day to day operating costs of The Foundation are fully covered by income generated from personal donations and sales of donated goods.

The source of our inventory is by donation from The Founder and friends like you but like most community non-profit organizations we are limited without adequate funding.

There are several ways you can contribute.

Check or Money Order

Please make contributions payable to the Foundation:

THE SPIRIT OF FREEDOM FOUNDATION
21900 Addington Blvd. Suite 104
Cleveland OH 44116-3952
Attn: Rod Miller :

E-Mail Online via PayPal    (        )

 PayPal handles all the major credit cards.

Is PayPal safe to use?

PayPal protects your financial information with industry-leading security and fraud prevention systems. When you use PayPal, your financial information is not shared with the merchant. Once your payment is complete, you will be emailed a receipt for this transaction.



We can send you an invoice if you send us an email and specify the amount you wish to contribute.




We can process your DEBIT CARD transaction.

 
We can process your Electronic CHECK  transaction.



Thank you for your support!


We have used PayPal for many years and believe it to be the most secure way to handle credit card transactions over the Internet. We very seldom give out credit card information over the Internet ... PayPal is the best way to go in our opinion.



Goods & Services Donations

We accept donations that we can resell. Preferred items we can best handle now are quality artworks, books and smaller pieces such as collectibles, jewelry, watches etc. To date, we have received artwork, cars and an apartment building. You get a receipt for FAIR MARKET VALUE! Please read FAQ and consult with your tax accountant.


Thought for the day

When did the Air Force last hold a bake sale to raise money for a new bomber ... or, the Navy for a nuclear submarine?

Every organization needs operating cash. We do just about whatever it takes, legally, to keep plodding forward.
To earn our keep, we distribute items on ebay under the name: thespiritoffreedomfoundation_rodmiller ... This keeps us in day-to-day operating cash and we maintain a 100% positive ebay rating.

We work to EARN our way ... 'Working for it' is a big part of our message so we practice what we preach.

If you agree with our Mission, a donation or contribution is an unexpected blessing and much appreciated.


About Public Charities and Private Foundations

Per GuideStar.org: "Note: The following discussion is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended to serve as legal or tax advice. For specific information about public charities and private foundations ("charitable organizations"), consult your attorney or tax adviser.

It can be so confusing … private non-operating foundations … private operating foundations … public charities … public charities that act as foundations. What are they, and how do you tell which is which?

Charitable organizations—the organizations in the Guide Star database—fall under Section 501(c)(3) of the U.S. Tax Code. The Internal Revenue Service divides charitable organizations into two groups: private foundations and public charities. With the exception of religious organizations and nonprofit's whose gross receipts are less than $5,000, the IRS usually defines every charitable organization as a private foundation, unless the nonprofit specifically requests classification as a public charity.

Public Charities

A public charity is a charitable organization that (a) has broad public support, (b) actively functions to support another public charity, or (c) is devoted exclusively to testing for public safety. Many public charities rely on contributions from the general public. Donations to public charities are tax deductible.

Public charities are the organizations people usually think of when they hear the word charity. These nonprofit's missions range from helping the poor to easing community tensions to advancing religion, education, or science.

Private Foundations

Private foundations are charitable organizations that do not qualify as public charities. In practice, they usually are nonprofit's that were established with funds from a single source or specific sources, such as family or corporate money.

Although contributions to private foundations technically are tax deductible, many of these nonprofit's do not accept donations. Instead, private foundations usually invest their principal funding, then distribute the income from investments for charitable purposes. Many have endowments.

The IRS recognizes two types of private foundations: private non-operating foundations and private operating foundations.

Although the IRS uses a number of criteria to distinguish between the two, in practice, the key difference between a private non-operating foundation and a private operating foundation is how each distributes its income:

A private non-operating foundation grants money to other charitable organizations.

A private operating foundation distributes funds to its own programs that exist for charitable purposes.

Both types of private foundations are subject to certain restrictions and requirements. For example, they must distribute a specific portion of their income for charitable purposes each year, and they cannot do business with their major contributors.


Charitable Contributions - Types of Qualified Charitable Organizations

Generally, only six types of charitable organizations can be qualified charitable organizations and accept tax deductible charitable contributions.

A community chest, corporation, trust, fund, or foundation organized or created in or under the laws of the United States, any state, the District of Columbia, or any possession of the United States (including Puerto Rico). It must be organized and operated only for the following purposes:
Religious,
Charitable,
Educational,
Scientific,
Literary purposes, or
For the prevention of cruelty to children or animals;
Certain organizations that foster national or international amateur sports competition also qualify."

THE SPIRIT OF FREEDOM FOUNDATION is a private operating foundation dedicated to American and World History education.



About donations and other asset contributions

What counts as a donation?

In plain English, a donation is money or goods given without getting anything of value in return. Our ethical standards are at least equal to Members of Congress.

Paying to attend an event, purchasing artworks, rare books, or renting the venue for an event or rehearsal is not considered (by the IRS) a donation. Some people, shall we say, bend the truth a bit when they file their income taxes, and count above the expenditures as donations. However, THAT is one way that the rich stay rich and Congress persons stay in office. PBS looks the other way too.

Do I have to get a receipt for my donation to count?

You are only required to obtain and keep an official receipt if you donate over $250 at once or if you donate property worth $250 or more (e.g. if you donate your art to benefit our annual art sale). If you donate artwork (or other assets) and the value of your artwork is over $250 and you would like a receipt for your records, we can email that to you for print out.


Exemption Requirements

Per the IRS:
"To be tax-exempt under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code, an organization must be organized and operated exclusively for exempt purposes set forth in section 501(c)(3), and none of its earnings may inure to any private shareholder or individual."


So, how do I deduct my contribution to a non-profit organization on my taxes?
Is there a special form to fill out?

Almost every non-profit will advertise or suggest to you that your donations to them are tax deductible. However, few tell you the following:
You can only deduct contributions on IRS form Schedule `A': Itemized Deductions -- If you are a tenant who does not earn over, say, $60,000 a year, or have exceptionally large medical expenses, or have a lot of job-related expenses for which you are not reimbursed, you will probably take the standard deduction and not file Schedule `A', and thus not be able to deduct your tax-deductible contributions.
For deductions greater than $500, Form 8283, Noncash Charitable Contributions, must be attached to the return.
(The table below is in the updating process.)
How much is my standard tax deduction? (2007- varies - estimated)
If your filing status is:
Your standard tax deduction is:
If 65 or over AND/OR blind add for EACH
Single
$5,150
$1,250
Married filing a joint tax return or Qualifying widow(er) with dependent child
$10,300
$1,000
Married filing a separate tax return
$5,150
$1,000
Head of Household
$7,550
$1,250
Dependent Children
The greater of $850 OR the amount of earned income, plus $300. Not to exceed $5,150 unless the dependent is blind. If blind add $1,250.


Can I deduct a cash or asset donation on Schedule `C'?

Yes, and here is the how and why: Advertising your business is a legitimate Schedule 'C' deduction.
This is the cleanest way to account for deducting your contribution. When you exchange your item of value for ADVERTISING on our web site, you gain valuable public relations exposure as a Sponsor of our educational public service message.

How does it help me to make a donation?

We can list you as a sponsor.


Thank you for your support and may God Bless America!



The SPIRIT OF FREEDOM FOUNDATION is a private operating foundation dedicated to Human Values and History Education.



This site created and maintained by Rod Miller
Founder, Executive Director, Webmaster, Wizard and Seer



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